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Fennel (foeniculum vulgare dulce)

Fennel - Herb 

  • Space plants: Thin to 15 cm
  • Harvest in 14-20 weeks.
  • Compatible with Lettuce, Chicory, Cucumber, Peas, Sage
  • Avoid growing close to Beans, Tomatoes
  • Grows to approx 1.5m. Can be repeat sown throughout the year or left to self seed.
  • Fennel prefers well-drained fertile soil.

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/fennel-and-fennel-seed-benefits#1

  • Fennel plants are green and white, with feathery leaves and yellow flowers.
  • Both the crunchy bulb and the seeds of the fennel plant have a mild, licorice-like flavor. Yet, the flavor of the seeds is more potent due to their powerful essential oils.
  • Aside from its many culinary uses, fennel and its seeds offer a wide array of health benefits and may provide antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial effects.

Health and medicinal benefits

  • Foeniculum vulgare, commonly known as fennel, is a flavorful culinary herb and medicinal plant.
  • Fennel plants are green and white, with feathery leaves and yellow flowers.
  • Aside from its many culinary uses, fennel and its seeds offer a wide array of health benefits and may provide antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial effects.

Both fennel and its seeds are packed with nutrients. Here’s the nutrition for 1 cup (87 grams) of raw fennel bulb and 1 tablespoon (6 grams) of dried fennel seeds:

  • As you can see, both fennel and fennel seeds are low in calories but provide many important nutrients
  • Fresh fennel bulb is a good source of vitamin C, a water-soluble vitamin critical for immune health, tissue repair, and collagen synthesis
  • Vitamin C also acts as a potent antioxidant in your body, protecting against cellular damage caused by unstable molecules called free radicals
  • Both the bulb and seeds contain the mineral manganese, which is important for enzyme activation, metabolism, cellular protection, bone development, blood sugar regulation, and wound healing
  • Aside from manganese, fennel and its seeds contain other minerals vital to bone health, including potassium, magnesium, and calcium
  • A 1-cup (87-grams) serving of raw fennel bulb packs 3 grams of fiber — 11% of the Daily Reference Value (DRV)
  • Diets high in fiber have been linked to a reduced risk of heart disease. A review of 22 studies associated a greater dietary fiber intake with a lower risk of heart disease. For every additional 7 grams of fiber consumed per day, heart disease risk decreased by 9%
  • Fennel and its seeds also contain nutrients like magnesium, potassium, and calcium, which play important roles in keeping your heart healthy
  • For example, including rich sources of potassium in your diet may help reduce high blood pressure, a risk factor for heart disease

If you are going to use Fennel to treat an existing health condition please consult with your healthcare provider first.